Fulfill the senior artists, and see the artwork, of the 2023 Annual Senior Thesis Exhibition | Information

Spring at Bates is when seniors get proximate to their upcoming skilled selfs. They may present thesis investigation at off-campus tutorial conferences, or, in the circumstance of studio artwork majors, current artwork below on campus at the Annual Senior Thesis Exhibition.

This year’s exhibition opens currently, April 14, in the highly specialist setting of the Bates College or university Museum of Art and operates as a result of Could 27.

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Go through or hear to each artist’s statement and see the artwork at this year’s Yearly Senior Thesis Exhibition at the Bates Higher education Museum of Artwork.

Approaching their primetime moment in the Bates museum, “our pupils are performing on that professional level” — assembly tricky deadlines and using steerage from gurus — “just as they would out in the entire world,” suggests Elke Morris, a senior lecturer in art and visible society who encouraged the studio artwork majors all through their yr-very long thesis efforts, alongside with Penelope Jones, a lecturer in art and visible tradition.

Frieda Kickliter ’23 (ideal) of Cellular, Ala., is effective with Michel Droge, a painter and printmaker who is a Bates lecturer in artwork and visible lifestyle, as she installs her senior thesis artwork in the Bates College of Museum of Artwork on April 11, 2023. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College or university)

With pro assistance from college and museum workers, who assist with the installation, lights, and other factors, the finish outcome “looks seriously good — a nice finish,” Morris claims.

A few studio artwork majors existing unique operates in this year’s exhibition.

With a collection of drawn and painted portraits, Jordan Wilson ’23 of Medfield, Mass., focuses on capturing times in time and all the moment specifics inside of them.

Frieda Kickliter ’23 of Cellular, Ala., is presenting big-scale colourful and geometric summary paintings referencing architecture and nature, discovering the marriage among the tangible and the obscured. 

A selection of ceramic dishes by Tricia Ballard ’23 of Larchmont, N.Y., highlights the features envisioned of day-to-day tableware, and provides to thoughts the compact joys of lifetime.

Installation in the Bates Museum of Art of Annual Senior Thesis Exhibition in the Main Gallery.

Senior Thesis Show 2023
April 14 – May 27, 2023

Since its dedication in 1986, The Bates College Museum of Art has maintained a special relationship with the college’s Department of Art & Visual Culture. Part of this is a commitment to supporting the work of Bates students through our Annual Senior Thesis Exhibition. The exhibition highlights work selected from the thesis projects of graduating seniors majoring in Studio Art.

Thesis projects vary from student to student, each pursuing an individual interest. The emphasis of the program is on creating a cohesive body of related works through sustained studio practice and critical inquiry. The year-long process is overseen by Art and Visual Culture faculty, and culminates in this exhibition.

Tricia Ballard ’23 (functional ceramic sets) a studio art major from Larchmont, N.Y.,

Frieda Kickliter ’23 (large scale abstract paintings), a studio art major from Mobile, Ala.

Jordan Wilson ’23 (collection of portraits drawn from pictures on my phone’s camera roll) of Medfield, Mass., a double major in art history and studio art

With the help of with the help of their faculty adviser Elke Morris and museum staffers staffer Michel Droge and Hannah Day and Kenny Shapiro, who work as preparators for the museum helping it transition between shows.
Set up on a wall in the Bates University Museum of Art, a portrait by Jordan Wilson ’23 of Medfield, Mass., awaits its exhibition label. For now, it’s simply just “Mom.” (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates Faculty)

“Three unique personalities, and of program unique bodies of get the job done,” Morris suggests. “Each has actual energy in particular regions, and they have been capable to establish those people, and press that ahead. They pay attention to tips, acquire the work very seriously, and place the work in. And that is what you ask for.”

Jordan Wilson 

In her artist’s assertion, Wilson suggests her thesis is a reflection on moments in time “that came and went in passing, described by the impermanent details that designed them.”

The art, you’ll see, is beautiful and striking.

Frieda Kickliter ’23, a studio art major from Mobile, Ala., is making large abstract paintings inspired by architecture and landscape. She shares a studio with her roommate Jordan Wilson ’23 of Medfield, Mass., a double major in art history and studio art, who’s painting portraits of people she knows. And Tricia Ballard ’23, a studio art major from Larchmont, N.Y., is a ceramicist who loves simplicity.

You’ll find the three of them in their Olin Arts Center studios with ) days to prepare for the installation of the Annual Senior Art Exhibition that opens on April 14 in the Bates College Museum of Art. The museum partners with the Department of Art and Visual culture to support the work of Bates students through an exhibition that highlights work selected from the thesis projects of graduating seniors majoring in studio art.
Thesis projects vary from student to student, each pursuing an individual interest. The emphasis of the program is on creating a cohesive body of related works through sustained studio practice and critical inquiry. The year-long process is overseen by Art and Visual Culture faculty, and culminates in this exhibition.
Stay tuned for more coverage of the installation and opening. 

(Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College) 

#batescollege #fineart #art #painting #ceramics #exhibition
Jordan Wilson ’23 of Medfield, Mass., a double significant in art historical past and studio artwork, paints portraits of folks she is aware of, performing from digital shots from her phone’s camera roll for references. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College or university)

Working with pictures from her phone’s digicam roll as references, Wilson made use of graphite, colored pencils, and oil paints to develop portraits of the folks about her, “casual shots that are not meant to be metaphorical, symbolic, or allegorical,” she explains, but that seize that impermanence and uniqueness of a solitary instant.

“I like how pens and pencils experience as they glide across paper and how thick oil paint coats my metallic knife when I drag it across glass to combine pigments till they are just correct,” states Wilson. “I like returning to the very same graphic about and around yet again. In this way, my thesis is also the material byproduct of my time put in looking and thinking about these passing moments and what manufactured them what they were being.”

The art, you’ll see, is beautiful and striking.

Frieda Kickliter ’23, a studio art major from Mobile, Ala., is making large abstract paintings inspired by architecture and landscape. She shares a studio with her roommate Jordan Wilson ’23 of Medfield, Mass., a double major in art history and studio art, who’s painting portraits of people she knows. And Tricia Ballard ’23, a studio art major from Larchmont, N.Y., is a ceramicist who loves simplicity.

You’ll find the three of them in their Olin Arts Center studios with ) days to prepare for the installation of the Annual Senior Art Exhibition that opens on April 14 in the Bates College Museum of Art. The museum partners with the Department of Art and Visual culture to support the work of Bates students through an exhibition that highlights work selected from the thesis projects of graduating seniors majoring in studio art.
Thesis projects vary from student to student, each pursuing an individual interest. The emphasis of the program is on creating a cohesive body of related works through sustained studio practice and critical inquiry. The year-long process is overseen by Art and Visual Culture faculty, and culminates in this exhibition.
Stay tuned for more coverage of the installation and opening. 

(Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College) 

#batescollege #fineart #art #painting #ceramics #exhibition
Jordan Wilson ’23 creates portraits with little specifics that convey a stillness that is simultaneously unsettling and comforting. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates Higher education)

By concentrating on the tiny facts, like the fold of a sleeve, or the curve of an eyebrow, she discovered a type of “stillness” that is at the same time unsettling and comforting. That minute will never come once again, but “without impermanence, time and room and lifestyle wouldn’t exist in the initial put.”

Frieda Kickliter 

Kickliter works by using ink and oil paint to create substantial-scale abstract images. She references architecture, landscapes, and crops for her perform “to sign a sense of familiarity with the tangible entire world,” she claims in her assertion.

The art, you’ll see, is beautiful and striking.

Frieda Kickliter ’23, a studio art major from Mobile, Ala., is making large abstract paintings inspired by architecture and landscape. She shares a studio with her roommate Jordan Wilson ’23 of Medfield, Mass., a double major in art history and studio art, who’s painting portraits of people she knows. And Tricia Ballard ’23, a studio art major from Larchmont, N.Y., is a ceramicist who loves simplicity.

You’ll find the three of them in their Olin Arts Center studios with ) days to prepare for the installation of the Annual Senior Art Exhibition that opens on April 14 in the Bates College Museum of Art. The museum partners with the Department of Art and Visual culture to support the work of Bates students through an exhibition that highlights work selected from the thesis projects of graduating seniors majoring in studio art.
Thesis projects vary from student to student, each pursuing an individual interest. The emphasis of the program is on creating a cohesive body of related works through sustained studio practice and critical inquiry. The year-long process is overseen by Art and Visual Culture faculty, and culminates in this exhibition.
Stay tuned for more coverage of the installation and opening. 

(Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College) 

#batescollege #fineart #art #painting #ceramics #exhibition
Frieda Kickliter ’23 of Mobile, Ala., is making substantial abstract paintings motivated by architecture and landscape. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates Faculty)

For her, the ink and oil lends an obscuring good quality to the images she paints strains above strains, by no means erasing anything at all, but layering the types and views, retaining “some spots a lot more representational, wondering about the partnership in between perceived, representational, and bodily spaces.”

“To me, the paintings are related to obscured recollections,” she says. “They capture the fragmented recollections of a number of factors in time and room.” It’s also a observe in expression, as she focuses on rhythm, movement, and “overlapping, isometric, linear, and irrational representations of space and sort.”

The art, you’ll see, is beautiful and striking.

Frieda Kickliter ’23, a studio art major from Mobile, Ala., is making large abstract paintings inspired by architecture and landscape. She shares a studio with her roommate Jordan Wilson ’23 of Medfield, Mass., a double major in art history and studio art, who’s painting portraits of people she knows. And Tricia Ballard ’23, a studio art major from Larchmont, N.Y., is a ceramicist who loves simplicity.

You’ll find the three of them in their Olin Arts Center studios with ) days to prepare for the installation of the Annual Senior Art Exhibition that opens on April 14 in the Bates College Museum of Art. The museum partners with the Department of Art and Visual culture to support the work of Bates students through an exhibition that highlights work selected from the thesis projects of graduating seniors majoring in studio art.
Thesis projects vary from student to student, each pursuing an individual interest. The emphasis of the program is on creating a cohesive body of related works through sustained studio practice and critical inquiry. The year-long process is overseen by Art and Visual Culture faculty, and culminates in this exhibition.
Stay tuned for more coverage of the installation and opening. 

(Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College) 

#batescollege #fineart #art #painting #ceramics #exhibition
“To me, the paintings are identical to obscured memories,” suggests Frieda Kickliter ’23. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates Faculty)

By mixing organic and natural and architectural styles, she creates an “abstraction of a familiar entire world,” leading her to “reconsider and feel critically about my unique romance and comprehension of the encompassing atmosphere.”

Tricia Ballard

Ballard’s thesis presentation is a collection of ceramic dishes, concentrating on the performance predicted of daily tableware, utilizing white and brown stoneware fired in a reduction kiln.

The art, you’ll see, is beautiful and striking.

Frieda Kickliter ’23, a studio art major from Mobile, Ala., is making large abstract paintings inspired by architecture and landscape. She shares a studio with her roommate Jordan Wilson ’23 of Medfield, Mass., a double major in art history and studio art, who’s painting portraits of people she knows. And Tricia Ballard ’23, a studio art major from Larchmont, N.Y., is a ceramicist who loves simplicity.

You’ll find the three of them in their Olin Arts Center studios with ) days to prepare for the installation of the Annual Senior Art Exhibition that opens on April 14 in the Bates College Museum of Art. The museum partners with the Department of Art and Visual culture to support the work of Bates students through an exhibition that highlights work selected from the thesis projects of graduating seniors majoring in studio art.
Thesis projects vary from student to student, each pursuing an individual interest. The emphasis of the program is on creating a cohesive body of related works through sustained studio practice and critical inquiry. The year-long process is overseen by Art and Visual Culture faculty, and culminates in this exhibition.
Stay tuned for more coverage of the installation and opening. 

(Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College) 

#batescollege #fineart #art #painting #ceramics #exhibition
Tricia Ballard ’23 of Larchmont, N.Y., is a ceramicist who enjoys simplicity. (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates College)

Influenced by the “generous handles, untrimmed ft, and thickly rimmed pots” in function by potter Clary Illian, Ballard would like her perform to “appear refined, but I also delight in leaving proof of its handmade top quality through a thumbprint at each handle’s attachment,” she claims in her assertion. “On some pots, I have drawn with slip or stain on their rounded surfaces. For other folks, a single glaze works finest to emphasize the underlying attractiveness of the throwing process.”

Right before Bates, she labored mainly with watercolors and drawings, and she has loved the tactile experience of working with ceramics, and acquired an appreciation for the “subtle delights that exist within a every day regime and am motivated by properties filled with particular art. I hope the utilitarian character of my artwork invitations some others to respect the connection amongst pottery, food, and modest joys concealed in the day-to-day.”

Installation in the Bates Museum of Art of Annual Senior Thesis Exhibition in the Main Gallery.

Senior Thesis Show 2023
April 14 – May 27, 2023

Since its dedication in 1986, The Bates College Museum of Art has maintained a special relationship with the college’s Department of Art & Visual Culture. Part of this is a commitment to supporting the work of Bates students through our Annual Senior Thesis Exhibition. The exhibition highlights work selected from the thesis projects of graduating seniors majoring in Studio Art.

Thesis projects vary from student to student, each pursuing an individual interest. The emphasis of the program is on creating a cohesive body of related works through sustained studio practice and critical inquiry. The year-long process is overseen by Art and Visual Culture faculty, and culminates in this exhibition.

Tricia Ballard ’23 (functional ceramic sets) a studio art major from Larchmont, N.Y.,

Frieda Kickliter ’23 (large scale abstract paintings), a studio art major from Mobile, Ala.

Jordan Wilson ’23 (collection of portraits drawn from pictures on my phone’s camera roll) of Medfield, Mass., a double major in art history and studio art

With the help of with the help of their faculty adviser Elke Morris and museum staffers staffer Michel Droge and Hannah Day and Kenny Shapiro, who work as preparators for the museum helping it transition between shows.
Tricia Ballard ’23 carries some of her ceramics whilst putting in her present at the Bates Museum of Art on April 11, 2023. She desires her do the job to “appear refined, but I also get pleasure from leaving evidence of its handmade top quality.” (Phyllis Graber Jensen/Bates Faculty)